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Antimicrobial Agent Use

Antimicrobial Prophylaxis for Surgery1 Guideline

Antimicrobial Prophylaxis for Surgery

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Published: American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy ; 2013 ; 70 : 195 -283
current

"Clinical Practice Guidelines for Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Surgery"

These guidelines were developed jointly by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Surgical Infection Society (SIS), and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). This work represents an update to the previously published ASHP Therapeutic Guidelines on Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Surgery, as well as guidelines from IDSA and SIS. The guidelines are intended to provide practitioners with a standardized approach to the rational, safe, and effective use of antimicrobial agents for the prevention of surgical-site infections (SSIs) based on currently available clinical evidence and emerging issues.

*For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, please contact the ASHP.

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Antimicrobial Stewardship2 Guidelines

Developing an Institutional Program to Enhance Antimicrobial Stewardship

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2007 ; 44 : 159 -77
current

"Guidelines for Developing an Institutional Program to Enhance Antimicrobial Stewardship"

This document presents guidelines for developing institutional programs to enhance antimicrobial stewardship, an activity that includes appropriate selection, dosing, route, and duration of antimicrobial therapy. The primary goal of antimicrobial stewardship is to optimize clinical outcomes while minimizing unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity, the selection of pathogenic organisms (such as Clostridium difficile), and the emergence of resistance. Thus, the appropriate use of antimicrobials is an essential part of patient safety and deserves careful oversight and guidance. Link to full text guideline
 
*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 07/2013.

Conducting Antimicrobial Stewardship

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Published: xx ; xx ; xx : xx -xx
in-dev

"IDSA/SHEA Clinical Practice Guidelines on Antimicrobial Stewardship"

The purpose of this guideline will be to present different approaches to antimicrobial stewardship in different health care settings assisting individual providers and institutions in determining how to individualize their own programs, based on resources.

*Projected Publication, Spring 2015

 

 

 

Combat-Related Infections1 Guideline

Combat-related Infections

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Published: J Trauma ; 2011 ; 71 : S210 -S234
endorsed

"Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update" (Endorsed by IDSA)

Despite advances in resuscitation and surgical management of combat wounds, infection remains a concerning and potentially preventable complication of combat-related injuries. Interventions currently used to prevent these infections have not been either clearly defined or subjected to rigorous clinical trials. Current infection prevention measures and wound management practices are derived from retrospective review of wartime experiences, from civilian trauma data, and from in vitro and animal data. This update to the guidelines published in 2008 incorporates evidence that has become available since 2007. These guidelines focus on care provided within hours to days of injury, chiefly within the combat zone, to those combat-injured patients with open wounds or burns. New in this update are a consolidation of antimicrobial agent recommendations to a backbone of high-dose cefazolin with or without metronidazole for most postinjury indications, and recommendations for redosing of antimicrobial agents, for use of negative pressure wound therapy, and for oxygen supplementation in flight.
 
*For information on the timing of an update to this guideline, please contact the AFIDS.

 

Neutropenic Patients with Cancer1 Guideline

Neutropenic Patients with Cancer

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2011 ; 52 : e56 -e93
current

"Clinical Practice Guideline for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer: 2010 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America"

This document updates and expands the initial Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Fever and Neutropenia Guideline that was published in 1997 and first updated in 2002. It is intended as a guide for the use of antimicrobial agents in managing patients with cancer who experience chemotherapy-induced fever and neutropenia. Link to full text guideline
 
*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013.

 

 

Outpatient Parenteral Anti-Infective Therapy (OPAT)1 Guideline

Outpatient Parenteral Anti-Infective Therapy (OPAT)

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2004 ; 38 : 1651 -1672
update in progress

"Practice Guidelines for Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy"

These guidelines were formulated to assist physicians and other health care professionals with various aspects of the administration of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT). Although there are many reassuring retrospective studies on the efficacy and safety of OPAT, few prospective studies have been conducted to compare the risks and outcomes for patients who receive treatment as outpatients rather than as inpatients. Because truly evidence-based studies are lacking, the present guidelines are formulated from the collective experience of the committee members and advisors from related organizations. Link to full text guideline

 

*Projected Publication, Spring 2016

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Vancomycin1 Guideline

Vancomycin

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Published: Am J Health-Syst Pharm ; 2009 ; 66 : 82 -98
update in progress

"Vancomycin Therapeutic Monitoring: Review and Recommendations from the ASHP, IDSA and SIDP Task Force"

Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic that has been in clinical use for nearly 50 years as a penicillin alternative to treat penicillinase-producing strains of Staphlococcus aureus. It is one of the most widely used antibiotics in the United States for the treatment of serious gram-positive infections involving methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Link to full text guideline

*For information on the timing of this update, please contact the ASHP.

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