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Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women — United States and Territories, May 2016


May 20, 2016

Download and read the full Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).


Synopsis

In February 2016, CDC, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, launched two comprehensive surveillance systems to report and monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among symptomatic and asymptomatic women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection in the United States and territories. As of May 12, 2016, there were 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection residing in participating U.S. states and U.S. territories, respectively. This report launches the weekly reporting of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection in U.S. states and territories. Monitoring all pregnant women with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy, whether asymptomatic or symptomatic, will enhance understanding of possible adverse outcomes and allow better estimates of the number of pregnancies at risk for adverse outcomes. This information will assist health care providers who counsel pregnant women and will facilitate planning services for affected families.

 

Summary

What is already known about this topic?

Zika virus infection during pregnancy causes microcephaly and other serious brain abnormalities. However, the full range of outcomes of asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy are not yet well understood.

What is added by this report?

In February 2016, CDC, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, launched comprehensive surveillance systems to report and actively monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among symptomatic and asymptomatic women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection. As of May 12, 2016, there were 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection residing in U.S. states and U.S. territories, respectively.

What are the implications for public health practice?
This report launches the weekly reporting of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection in U.S. states and territories. Monitoring all pregnant women with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy, whether asymptomatic or symptomatic, will enhance understanding of possible adverse outcomes and allow better estimates of the number of pregnancies at risk for adverse outcomes. This information will assist health care providers who counsel pregnant women and will facilitate planning services for affected families

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