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Infections by Organism

Bacteria6 Guidelines

Lyme Disease

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2006 ; 43 : 1089 -1134
current

"The Clinical Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention of Lyme Disease, Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis, and Babesiosis"

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne infection in both North America and Europe. In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by the bite of the tick species Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus. Clinical manifestations most often involve the skin, joints, nervous system, and heart. Link to full text guideline

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 10/2011.  

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Clostridium difficile

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Published: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology ; 2010 ; 31 : 431 -455
update in progress

"Clinical Practice Guidelines for Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults: 2010 Update by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)"

This guideline is designed to improve the diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adult patients. A case of CDI is defined by the presence of symptoms (usually diarrhea) and either a stool test positive for C. difficile toxins or toxigenic C. difficile, or colonoscopic or histopathologic findings revealing pseudomembranous colitis. In addition to diagnosis and management, recommended methods of infection control and environmental management of the pathogen are presented. The recommendations are based on the best available evidence and practices, as determined by a joint Expert Panel appointed by SHEA and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) (the SHEA-IDSA Expert Panel). The use of these guidelines can be impacted by the size of the institution and the resources, both financial and laboratory, available in the particular clinical setting. Link to full text guideline

 

*Projected publication, Spring 2015

MRSA

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2011 ; 52 : 1 -38
current

"Management of Patients with Infections Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)"

Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for adult and pediatric patients with MRSA infections. The guidelines discuss the management of a variety of clinical syndromes associated with MRSA disease, including skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), bacteremia and endocarditis, pneumonia, bone and joint infections, and central nervous system (CNS) infections. Recommendations are provided regarding vancomycin dosing and monitoring, management of infections due to MRSA strains with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, and vancomycin treatment failures. Link to full text guideline

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 12/2012.

Nervous System Lyme Disease

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Published: Neurology ; 2007 ; 69 : 91 -102
endorsed

"Practice Parameter: Treatment of Nervous System Lyme Disease (AAN)" (Endorsed by IDSA)

Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which frequently affects the nervous system. Published guidelines are available to assist in the diagnosis of nervous system Lyme disease, and for treatment of Lyme disease in general. However, there continues to be considerable controversy and uncertainty about the best approach to treatment of neuroborreliosis.
 
*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact the AAN.

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Nontuberculous Mycobacterial (NTM) Diseases

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Published: American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care Medicine ; 2007 ; 175 : 367 -416
current

"Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Diseases"

The minimum evaluation of a patient suspected of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung disease should include the following: (1) chest radiograph or, in the absence of cavitation, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan; (2) three or more sputum specimens for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) analysis; and (3) exclusion of other disorders, such as tuberculosis (TB). Clinical, radiographic, and microbiologic criteria are equally important and all must be met to make a diagnosis of NTM lung disease.
 
*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact the ATS.

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Control of Tuberculosis (TB)

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Published: American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care Medicine ; 2005 ; 172 : 1169 -1227
endorsed

"Controlling Tuberculosis in the United States (ATS)" (Endorsed by IDSA)

During 1993–2003, incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in the United States decreased 44% and is now occurring at a historic low level (14,874 cases in 2003)... In this statement, the American Thoracic Society (ATS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) propose recommendations to improve the control and prevention of TB in the United States and to progress toward its elimination.

 

 

*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact the ATS.

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Fungi7 Guidelines

Aspergillus

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2008 ; 46 : 327 -360
update in progress

"Treatment of Aspergillosis"

Aspergillus species have emerged as an important cause of life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. This expanding population is composed of patients with prolonged neutropenia, advanced HIV infection, and inherited immunodeficiency and patients who have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and/or lung transplantation. This document constitutes the guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America for treatment of aspergillosis and replaces the practice guidelines for Aspergillus published in 2000. Link to full text guideline

 

*Projected Publication, Spring 2015

Blastomycosis

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2008 ; 46 : 1801 -1812
current

"Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Blastomycosis"

Blastomycosis refers to disease caused by the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis. This infection occurs most often in persons living in midwestern, southeastern, and south central United States and the Canadian provinces that border the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway. Recent reports have shown an increase in the incidence of blastomycosis in some of these regions. Link to full text guideline

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013.

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Coccidioidomycosis

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2005 ; 41 : 1217 -1223
update in progress

"Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis"

Management of coccidioidomycosis first involves recognizing that a coccidioidal infection exists, defining the extent of infection, and identifying host factors that predispose to disease severity. After these assessments, patients with localized acute pulmonary infections and no risk factors for complications often require only periodic reassessment to demonstrate resolution of their self-limited process. On the other hand, patients with extensive spread of infection or who are at high risk of complications because of immunosuppression or other preexisting factors require a variety of treatment strategies that may include antifungal drug therapy, surgical debridement, or a combination of both. Link to full text guideline

 

*Projected publication, Spring 2015

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Cryptococcal Disease

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2010 ; 50 : 291 -322
current

"Practice Guidelines for the Management of Cryptococcal Disease"

Cryptococcosis is a global invasive mycosis associated with significant morbidity and mortality. These guidelines for its management have been built on the previous Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines from 2000 and include new sections. There is a discussion of the management of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in 3 risk groups: (1) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals, (2) organ transplant recipients, and (3) non–HIV‐infected and nontransplant hosts. There are specific recommendations for other unique risk populations, such as children, pregnant women, persons in resource‐limited environments, and those with Cryptococcus gattii infection. Link to full text guideline

 

 *Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013.

Candidiasis

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2009 ; 42 : 503 -535
update in progress

"Guidelines for The Management of Candidiasis"

Guidelines for the management of patients with invasive candidiasis and mucosal candidiasis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous guidelines published in the 15 January 2004 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases and are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have or are at risk of these infections. Link to full text guideline

 

*Projected publication, Spring 2015

Histoplasmosis

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2007 ; 45 : 807 -825
current

"Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Histoplasmosis: 2007 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America"

These updated guidelines replace the previous treatment guidelines published in 2000. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. Since 2000, several new antifungal agents have become available, and clinical trials and case series have increased our understanding of the management of histoplasmosis. Advances in immunosuppressive treatment for inflammatory disorders have created new questions about the approach to prevention and treatment of histoplasmosis. Link to full text guideline

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 06/2011.

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Sporotrichosis

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2007 ; 45 : 1255 -1265
current

"Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Sporotrichosis: 2007 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America"

Guidelines for the management of patients with sporotrichosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and replace the guidelines published in 2000... They include evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with lymphocutaneous, cutaneous, pulmonary, osteoarticular, meningeal, and disseminated sporotrichosis. Recommendations are also provided for the treatment of sporotrichosis in pregnant women and in children. Link to full text guideline

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013.

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HIV/AIDS7 Guidelines

Primary Care Management of HIV-Infected Patients

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2013 ; xx : 1 -35
current

"Primary Care Guidelines for the Management of Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: 2013 Update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America"

Evidence-based guidelines for the management of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were prepared by an expert panel of the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace those published in 2009. The guidelines are intended for use by healthcare providers who care for HIV-infected patients. Since 2009, new antiretroviral drugs and classes have become available, and the prognosis of persons with HIV infection continues to improve. Link to full text guideline

 

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was published in November of 2013 and is the most current version.

Management of Chronic Kidney Disease

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2014 ; xx : xx -xx
current

"Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Chronic Kidney Disease in Patients Infected With HIV: 2014 Update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America"

These guidelines for the management of CKD in patients infected with HIV are an update of the 2005 version [2], designed to identify clinically relevant management questions, summarize pertinent data from clinical studies, and offer recommendations for clinical care. The scope of this document is CKD in HIV-infected adults and children in the United States. The guidelines do not address screening, evaluation, or management of HIV-related kidney disease in resource-constrained settings. Link to full text guideline

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was published in September of 2014 and is the most current version.

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Management of Dyslipidemia in Adults Receiving ART

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2003 ; 37 : 613 -627
retired

"Guidelines for the Evaluation and Management of Dyslipidemia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)–Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy"

Dyslipidemia is a common problem affecting HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Since publication of preliminary guidelines in 2000, numerous studies have addressed the risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanisms of dyslipidemia, drug interactions, and the treatment of lipid disorders in HIV-infected patients. Link to full text guideline
 
*This guideline has been retired, however some information regarding dyslipidemia in adults receiving ART can be found in the forthcoming update to the "Primary Care Guideline".

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Pain Management for Patients with HIV

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Published: TBD ; 2012 ; x : x -x
in-dev

"HIVMA of IDSA Clinical Practice Guidelines on Pain Management for Patients with HIV"

*Projected Publication, Fall 2015

Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among Adults and Adolescents

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Published: AIDSinfo ; 2013 ; May : 1 -416
current

"Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents"

Updated guidelines for the prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV-Infected adults and adolescents. Link to full text guideline

*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact AIDSinfo.

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Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among Children

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Published: xx ; 2013 ; : -
current

"Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children"

Updated guidelines for the prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections among HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children. Link to full text guideline
 
*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact AIDSinfo.

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International Standards for Care of Tuberculosis

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Published: World Health Organization ; 2006 ; n/a : 1 -60
endorsed

"International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (WHO)" (Endorsed by IDSA)

The purpose of the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC) is to describe a widely accepted level of care that all practitioners, public and private, should seek to achieve in managing patients who have, or are suspected of having, tuberculosis. The Standards are intended to facilitate the effective engagement of all care providers in delivering high-quality care for patients of all ages, including those with sputum smear-positive, sputum smear-negative, and extra pulmonary tuberculosis, tuberculosis caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (M. tuberculosis) organisms, and tuberculosis combined with human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV) infection.
 
*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact the WHO.

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Parasites2 Guidelines

Leishmaniasis

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases
in-dev

"Clinical Practice Guidelines on Leishmaniasis"

*Projected Publication, Spring 2015

Cysticercosis

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases
in-dev

"Clinical Practice Guidelines on Cysticercosis"

*Projected Publication, Spring 2015

Viruses4 Guidelines

Hepatitis C

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Published: HEPATOLOGY ; 2011 ; 54 : 1433 -1444
endorsed

"Diagnosis, Management and Treatment of Hepatitis C (AASLD)" (Endorsed by IDSA)

Intended for use by physicians, these recommendations suggest preferred approaches to the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive aspects of care. They are intended to be flexible, in contrast to standards of care, which are inflexible policies to be followed in every case. Specific recommendations are based on relevant published information. To more fully characterize the quality of evidence supporting recommendations, the Practice Guidelines Committee of the AASLD requires a Class (reflecting benefit versus risk) and Level (assessing strength or certainty) of Evidence to be assigned and reported with each recommendation (Table 1, adapted from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association Practice Guidelines). Link to full text guideline

 

*For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, contact the AASLD.

 

 

 

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HCV Guidance

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Published: xx
current

"Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C"

New direct-acting oral agents capable of curing hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have been approved for use in the United States. The initial direct-acting agents were approved in 2011, and many more oral drugs are expected to be approved in the next few years. As new information is presented at scientific conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals, health care practitioners have expressed a need for a credible source of unbiased guidance on how best to treat their patients with HCV infection. Link to full website

Hepatitis B

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Published: HEPATOLOGY ; 2009 ; 50 : 1 -36
endorsed

"Chronic Hepatitis B (AASLD)" (Endorsed by IDSA)

These guidelines have been written to assist physicians and other health care providers in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). These recommendations provide a data-supported approach to patients with hepatitis B. Link to full text guideline
 
*For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, contact the AASLD.

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Influenza

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2009 ; 48 : 1003 -1032
update in progress

"Seasonal Influenza in Adults and Children—Diagnosis, Treatment, Chemoprophylaxis, and Institutional Outbreak Management: Clinical Practice Guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America"

Guidelines for the treatment of persons with influenza virus infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence‐based guidelines encompass diagnostic issues, treatment and chemoprophylaxis with antiviral medications, and issues related to institutional outbreak management for seasonal (interpandemic) influenza. They are intended for use by physicians in all medical specialties with direct patient care, because influenza virus infection is common in communities during influenza season and may be encountered by practitioners caring for a wide variety of patients. Link to full text guideline

 

 

*Projected publication, Fall 2015

 

 

Statement by the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) on the recent publication on “Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in healthy adults and children"- April 2014

 

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