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Other Guidelines

Fever and Infections2 Guidelines

Fever and Infection in Long-term Care Facilities

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2009 ; 48 : 149 -171
current

"Practice Guideline for Evaluation of Fever and Infection in Long-Term Care Facilities"

Residents of long-terms facilities (LTCFs) are at great risk for infection. Most residents are older and have multiple comorbidities that recognition of infection; for example, typically defined fever is absent in more than one-half of LTCF residents with serious infection. Furthermore, LTCFs often do not have the on-site equipment or personnel to evaluate suspected infection in the fashion typically performed in acute care hospitals. In recognition of the difference between LTCFs and hospitals with regard to hosts and resources present, the Infectious Diseases Society of America first provided guidelines for Evaluation of fever and infection in LTCF residents in 2000. The guideline presented here presented here represents the second edition, updated by data generated over the intervening 8 years. Link to full text guideline

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013.

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New Fever in Critically Ill Patients

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Published: Crit Care Med ; 2008 ; 36 : 1330 -1349
update in progress

"Guidelines for evaluation of new fever in critically ill adult patients: 2008 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine and the Infectious Diseases Society of America"

In some intensive care units (ICUs), the measurement of a newly elevated temperature triggers automatic orders for many tests that are time-consuming, costly, and disruptive. Moreover, the patient may experience discomfort, be exposed to unneeded radiation, or experience considerable blood loss as a result of this testing, which is often repeated several times within 24 hours and daily thereafter. In an era when use of hospital and patient resources is under intensive scrutiny, it is appropriate to assess how such fevers should be evaluated in a prudent and cost-effective manner.

 

*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact SCCM.

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Other6 Guidelines

Laboratory Diagnosis of Infectious Disease

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2013 ; : 1 -100
current

"A Guide to Utilization of the Microbiology Laboratory for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases: 2013 Recommendations by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM)"

The critical role of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the health care team. This document, developed by both laboratory and clinical experts, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions. Link to full text guideline 

Management of Catheter-related Infections

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2009 ; 49 : 1 -45
update in progress

"Guidelines for the Management of Intravascular Catheter–Related Infections"

These updated guidelines replace the previous management guidelines published in 2001. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. Link to full text guideline

 

**Projected Publication, Spring 2017

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Opportunistic Infections in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

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Published: Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 2009 ; 15 : 1143 -1238
endorsed

"Guidelines for Preventing Infections Complications Among Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients: A Global Perspective" (Endorsed by IDSA)

In the past decade, modifications in HCT management and supportive care have resulted in changes in recommendations for the prevention of infection in HCT patients. These changes are fueled by new antimicrobial agents, increased knowledge of immune reconstitution, and expanded conditioning regimens and patient populations eligible for HCT. Despite these advances, infection is reported as the primary cause of death in 8% of autologous HCT patients and 17% to 20% of allogeneic HCT recipients [3]. The major changes in this document, including changes in recommendation ratings, are summarized here.

 

*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact CIBMTR.

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Prevention of Catheter-related Infections

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2011 ; 52 : e1 -e32
endorsed

"Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter–Related Infections" (Endorsed by IDSA)

These guidelines have been developed for healthcare personnel who insert intravascular catheters and for persons responsible for surveillance and control of infections in hospital, outpatient, and home healthcare settings. This report was prepared by a working group comprising members from professional organizations representing the disciplines of critical care medicine, infectious diseases, healthcare infection control, surgery, anesthesiology, interventional radiology, pulmonary medicine, pediatric medicine, and nursing. Link to full text guideline

 

*For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact the SCCM.

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Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals

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Published: Infect Control Hosp Epidemio ; 2014 ; : -
current

"A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals"

SHEA and IDSA, with partner organizations AHA, APIC, and the Joint Commission in 2014 updated the popular science-based and practical recommendations for acute care hospitals for the prevention of common HAIs in Infection Control and Healthcare Epidemiology, originally published in 2008.Link to full text guideline

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Vaccination of the Immunocompromised Host

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Published: Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 2013 ; xx : 1 -57
current

"2013 IDSA Clinical Practice Guideline for Vaccination of the Immunocompromised Host"

These guidelines were created to provide primary care and specialty clinicians with evidence-based guidelines for active immunization of patients with altered immunocompetence and their household contacts in order to safely prevent vaccine-preventable infections. They do not represent the only approach to vaccination. Recommended immunization schedules for normal adults and children as well as certain adults and children at high risk for vaccine-preventable infections are updated and published annually by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and partner organizations. Link to full text guideline

 

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was published in December of 2013 and is the most current version.

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