search icon
Join IDSAJOIN IDSA >> Go to MyIDSAGO TO MYIDSA >>
  • Print
  • ShareThis
  • Text Size

IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Keyword Search

...

Search Results

28 results found

Bacterial Meningitis

Status: Under Review

The objective of these practice guidelines is to provide clinicians with recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial meningitis. Patients with bacterial meningitis are usually treated by primary care

The objective of these practice guidelines is to provide clinicians with recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial meningitis. Patients with bacterial meningitis are usually treated by primary care and emergency medicine physicians at the time of initial presentation, often in consultation with infectious diseases specialists, neurologists, and neurosurgeons. In contrast to many other infectious diseases, the antimicrobial therapy for bacterial meningitis is not always based on randomized, prospective, double-blind clinical trials, but rather on data initially obtained from experimental animal models of infections. A model commonly utilized is the experimental rabbit model, in which animals are anesthetized and placed in a stereotactic frame. In this procedure, the cisterna magna can be punctured for frequent sampling of CSF and injection of microorganisms. Frequent sampling of CSF permits measurement of leukocytes and chemical parameters and quantitation of the relative penetration of antimicrobial agents into CSF and the effects of meningitis on this entry parameter, the relative bactericidal efficacy (defined as the rate of bacterial eradication) within purulent CSF, and CSF pharmacodynamics. Results obtained from these and other animal models have led to clinical trials of specific agents in patients with bacterial meningitis. Full text*The 2004 Practice Guidelines for the Management of Bacterial Meningitis has been split into two guidelines. The nosocomial guideline was published in 2017. For recommendations on community acquired, please see the original guideline in 2004.*This guideline is being either under reviewed to determine if it requires updating or is on the slate to be updated. Please use this version with discretion, as it possible that some information may be outdated.

Outpatient Parenteral Anti-Infective Therapy (OPAT)

Status: Update in Progress

These guidelines were formulated to assist physicians and other health care professionals with various aspects of the administration of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT). Although there are many reassuring retrospective

These guidelines were formulated to assist physicians and other health care professionals with various aspects of the administration of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT). Although there are many reassuring retrospective studies on the efficacy and safety of OPAT, few prospective studies have been conducted to compare the risks and outcomes for patients who receive treatment as outpatients rather than as inpatients. Because truly evidence-based studies are lacking, the present guidelines are formulated from the collective experience of the committee members and advisors from related organizations.  Full text*Projected Publication, Spring 2018

Management of Dyslipidemia in Adults Receiving ART

Status: Retired

Dyslipidemia is a common problem affecting HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Since publication of preliminary guidelines in 2000, numerous studies have addressed the risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanisms of

Dyslipidemia is a common problem affecting HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Since publication of preliminary guidelines in 2000, numerous studies have addressed the risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanisms of dyslipidemia, drug interactions, and the treatment of lipid disorders in HIV-infected patients. In addition, updated recommendations from the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III [ATP III]) have been published that materially affect the clinical approach to lipid disorders in the general population.*Information contained in the following guideline is outdated or superseded by another publication and should be used for historical purposes only.

Fever and Infection in Long-term Care Facilities

Status: Current

Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are at great risk for infection. Most residents are older and have multiple comorbidities that complicate recognition of infection; for example, typically defined fever

Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are at great risk for infection. Most residents are older and have multiple comorbidities that complicate recognition of infection; for example, typically defined fever is absent in more than one-half of LTCF residents with serious infection. Furthermore, LTCFs often do not have the on-site equipment or personnel to evaluate suspected infection in the fashion typically performed in acute care hospitals. In recognition of the differences between LTCFs and hospitals with regard to hosts and resources present, the Infectious Diseases Society of America first provided guidelines for evaluation of fever and infection in LTCF residents in 2000. The guideline presented here represents the second edition, updated by data generated over the intervening 8 years. It focuses on the typical elderly person institutionalized with multiple chronic comorbidities and functional disabilities (e.g., a nursing home resident). Specific topic reviews and recommendations are provided with regard to what resources are typically available to evaluate suspected infection, what symptoms and signs suggest infection in a resident of an LTCF, who should initially evaluate the resident with suspected infection, what clinical evaluation should be performed, how LTCF staff can effectively communicate about possible infection with clinicians, and what laboratory tests should be ordered. Finally, a general outline of how a suspected outbreak of a specific infectious disease should be investigated in an LTCF is provided. Full Text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013.

Neutropenic Patients

Status: New Guideline in Development

Joint publication with the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) *Projected publication, Winter 2018

Joint publication with the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) *Projected publication, Winter 2018

Critically Ill Patients

Status: New Guideline in Development

Joint publication with the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM)*Projected publication, Winter 2019

Joint publication with the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM)*Projected publication, Winter 2019

Bone and Joint Infections

Status: New Guideline in Development

*Projected Publication, Fall 2018

*Projected Publication, Fall 2018

Staph Aureus Bacteremia

Status: New Guideline in Development

*Projected Publication, Summer 2019

*Projected Publication, Summer 2019

| HIVMA | Contact Us

© Copyright IDSA 2018 Infectious Diseases Society of America

Full Site Mobile Site