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IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

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Latest Guidelines

Vancomycin

Status: Update in Progress

Vancomycin is a glycopeptideantibiotic that has been in clinical use for nearly 50 years as a penicillin alternative to treat penicillinase-producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the most

Vancomycin is a glycopeptideantibiotic that has been in clinical use for nearly 50 years as a penicillin alternative to treat penicillinase-producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the most widely used antibiotics in the United States for the treatment of serious gram-positive infections involving methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA). Early use of vancomycin was associated with a number of adverse effects, including infusion-related toxicities, nephrotoxicity, and possible ototoxicity. Upon further investigation, it appears that the impurities in early formulations of vancomycin caused many of these adverse events. Its overall use was curtailed significantly with the development of semisynthetic penicillins (e.g., methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin) that were considered less toxic. However, the steady rise in the number of MRSA infections since the early 1980s has once again brought vancomycin into the forefront as the primary treatment for infections caused by this organism.Full text*For information on the timing of this update, please contact the ASHP.

Encephalitis

Status: Current

Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with encephalitis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The guidelines are intended for use by

Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with encephalitis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients with encephalitis. The guideline includes data on the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of many viral, bacterial, fungal, protozoal, and helminthic etiologies of encephalitis and provides information on when specific etiologic agents should be considered in individual patients with encephalitis. Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 07/2011.

Blastomycosis

Status: Current

Blastomycosis refers to disease caused by the dimorphic fungusBlastomyces dermatitidis.This infection occurs most often in persons living in midwestern, southeastern, and south central United States and the Canadian provinces that

Blastomycosis refers to disease caused by the dimorphic fungusBlastomyces dermatitidis.This infection occurs most often in persons living in midwestern, southeastern, and south central United States and the Canadian provinces that border the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway. Recent reports have shown an increase in the incidence of blastomycosis in some of these regions. Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013.

New Fever in Critically Ill Patients

Status: Update in Progress

In some intensive care units (ICUs), the measurement of a newly elevated temperature triggers automatic orders for many tests that are time-consuming, costly, and disruptive. Moreover, the patient may experience

In some intensive care units (ICUs), the measurement of a newly elevated temperature triggers automatic orders for many tests that are time-consuming, costly, and disruptive. Moreover, the patient may experience discomfort, be exposed to unneeded radiation, or experience considerable blood loss as a result of this testing, which is often repeated several times within 24 hours and daily thereafter. In an era when use of hospital and patient resources is under intensive scrutiny, it is appropriate to assess how such fevers should be evaluated in a prudent and cost-effective manner. *For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact SCCM

Sporotrichosis

Status: Current

Guidelines for the management of patients with sporotrichosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and replace the guidelines published in 2000... They include

Guidelines for the management of patients with sporotrichosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and replace the guidelines published in 2000... They include evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with lymphocutaneous, cutaneous, pulmonary, osteoarticular, meningeal, and disseminated sporotrichosis. Recommendations are also provided for the treatment of sporotrichosis in pregnant women and in children.*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013

Endocarditis Prevention

Status: Current, Endorsed

Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but life-threatening infection. Despite advances in diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy, surgical techniques, and management of complications, patients with IE still have high morbidity and mortality

Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but life-threatening infection. Despite advances in diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy, surgical techniques, and management of complications, patients with IE still have high morbidity and mortality rates related to this condition. Since the last American Heart Association (AHA) publication on prevention of IE in 1997, many authorities and societies, as well as the conclusions of published studies, have questioned the efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent IE in patients who undergo a dental, gastrointestinal (GI), or genitourinary (GU) tract procedure and have suggested that the AHA guidelines should be revised. Full text*For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, please contact the AHA.

Histoplasmosis

Status: Current

These updated guidelines replace the previous treatment guidelines published in 2000. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections

These updated guidelines replace the previous treatment guidelines published in 2000. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. Since 2000, several new antifungal agents have become available, and clinical trials and case series have increased our understanding of the management of histoplasmosis. Advances in immunosuppressive treatment for inflammatory disorders have created new questions about the approach to prevention and treatment of histoplasmosis.  Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 06/2011.

Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP)

Status: Update in Progress

Improving the care of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been the focus of many different organizations, and several have developed guidelines for management of CAP. Two of the

Improving the care of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been the focus of many different organizations, and several have developed guidelines for management of CAP. Two of the most widely referenced are those of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS). In response to confusion regarding differences between their respective guidelines, the IDSA and the ATS convened a joint committee to develop a unified CAP guideline document. Full text*Projected Publication, Spring 2018

Nontuberculous Mycobacterial (NTM) Diseases

Status: Update in Progress

The minimum evaluation of a patient suspected of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung disease should include the following: (1) chest radiograph or, in the absence of cavitation, chest high-resolution computed tomography

The minimum evaluation of a patient suspected of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung disease should include the following: (1) chest radiograph or, in the absence of cavitation, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan; (2) three or more sputum specimens for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) analysis; and (3) exclusion of other disorders, such as tuberculosis (TB). Clinical, radiographic, and microbiologic criteria are equally important and all must be met to make a diagnosis of NTM lung disease. *For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact the ATS.

Antimicrobial Stewardship

Status: Retired

This document presents guidelines for developing institutional programs to enhance antimicrobial stewardship, an activity that includes appropriate selection, dosing, route, and duration of antimicrobial therapy. The primary goal of antimicrobial

This document presents guidelines for developing institutional programs to enhance antimicrobial stewardship, an activity that includes appropriate selection, dosing, route, and duration of antimicrobial therapy. The primary goal of antimicrobial stewardship is to optimize clinical outcomes while minimizing unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity, the selection of pathogenic organisms (such as Clostridium difficile), and the emergence of resistance. Thus, the appropriate use of antimicrobials is an essential part of patient safety and deserves careful oversight and guidance. Full text *Information contained in the following guideline is outdated or superseded by another publication and should be used for historical purposes only. For recommendations on Implementing an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, please see the new guidelines.

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