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IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

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27 results found

Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals

Status: Update in Progress

SHEA and IDSA, with partner organizations AHA, APIC, and the Joint Commission in 2014 updated the popular science-based and practical recommendations for acute care hospitals for the prevention of common

SHEA and IDSA, with partner organizations AHA, APIC, and the Joint Commission in 2014 updated the popular science-based and practical recommendations for acute care hospitals for the prevention of common HAIs in Infection Control and Healthcare Epidemiology, originally published in 2008

Laboratory Diagnosis of Infectious Disease

Status: Update in Progress

The critical role of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the

The critical role of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the health care team. This document, developed by both laboratory and clinical experts, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions.  Full text*Projected Publication, Summer 2018

Clostridium difficile

Status: Update in Progress

This guideline is designed to improve the diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adult patients. A case of CDI is defined by the presence of symptoms (usually diarrhea) and

This guideline is designed to improve the diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adult patients. A case of CDI is defined by the presence of symptoms (usually diarrhea) and either a stool test positive for C. difficile toxins or toxigenic C. difficile, or colonoscopic or histopathologic findings revealing pseudomembranous colitis. In addition to diagnosis and management, recommended methods of infection control and environmental management of the pathogen are presented. The recommendations are based on the best available evidence and practices, as determined by a joint Expert Panel appointed by SHEA and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) (the SHEA-IDSA Expert Panel). The use of these guidelines can be impacted by the size of the institution and the resources, both financial and laboratory, available in the particular clinical setting. Full text*Projected publication, Fall 2017

Intra-abdominal Infections

Status: Update in Progress

A Panel of International Experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in collaboration with the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) to update the

A Panel of International Experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in collaboration with the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) to update the 1999 Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection Guidelines by the IDSA. Co-sponsoring organizations include the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Urological Association, Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases–Canada, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The focus of this work is treatment of women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis, diagnoses limited in these guidelines to premenopausal, non-pregnant women with no known urological abnormalities or co-morbidities. The issues of in vitro resistance prevalence and the ecological adverse effects of antimicrobial therapy (collateral damage) were considered as important factors in making optimal treatment choices and thus are reflected in the rankings of recommendations. Full text*Projected Publication, Summer 2018

Management of Catheter-Related Infections

Status: Update in Progress

These updated guidelines replace the previous management guidelines published in 2001. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections

These updated guidelines replace the previous management guidelines published in 2001. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. Full text Projected Publication, Spring 2018

Influenza

Status: Update in Progress

Guidelines for the treatment of persons with influenza virus infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence‐based guidelines encompass diagnostic issues, treatment

Guidelines for the treatment of persons with influenza virus infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence‐based guidelines encompass diagnostic issues, treatment and chemoprophylaxis with antiviral medications, and issues related to institutional outbreak management for seasonal (interpandemic) influenza. They are intended for use by physicians in all medical specialties with direct patient care, because influenza virus infection is common in communities during influenza season and may be encountered by practitioners caring for a wide variety of patients. Full text*Projected publication, Spring 2018Statement by the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) on the recent publication on “Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in healthy adults and children"- April 2014

Vancomycin

Status: Update in Progress

Vancomycin is a glycopeptideantibiotic that has been in clinical use for nearly 50 years as a penicillin alternative to treat penicillinase-producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the most

Vancomycin is a glycopeptideantibiotic that has been in clinical use for nearly 50 years as a penicillin alternative to treat penicillinase-producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the most widely used antibiotics in the United States for the treatment of serious gram-positive infections involving methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA). Early use of vancomycin was associated with a number of adverse effects, including infusion-related toxicities, nephrotoxicity, and possible ototoxicity. Upon further investigation, it appears that the impurities in early formulations of vancomycin caused many of these adverse events. Its overall use was curtailed significantly with the development of semisynthetic penicillins (e.g., methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin) that were considered less toxic. However, the steady rise in the number of MRSA infections since the early 1980s has once again brought vancomycin into the forefront as the primary treatment for infections caused by this organism.Full text*For information on the timing of this update, please contact the ASHP.

New Fever in Critically Ill Patients

Status: Update in Progress

In some intensive care units (ICUs), the measurement of a newly elevated temperature triggers automatic orders for many tests that are time-consuming, costly, and disruptive. Moreover, the patient may experience

In some intensive care units (ICUs), the measurement of a newly elevated temperature triggers automatic orders for many tests that are time-consuming, costly, and disruptive. Moreover, the patient may experience discomfort, be exposed to unneeded radiation, or experience considerable blood loss as a result of this testing, which is often repeated several times within 24 hours and daily thereafter. In an era when use of hospital and patient resources is under intensive scrutiny, it is appropriate to assess how such fevers should be evaluated in a prudent and cost-effective manner. *For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact SCCM

Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP)

Status: Update in Progress

Improving the care of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been the focus of many different organizations, and several have developed guidelines for management of CAP. Two of the

Improving the care of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been the focus of many different organizations, and several have developed guidelines for management of CAP. Two of the most widely referenced are those of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS). In response to confusion regarding differences between their respective guidelines, the IDSA and the ATS convened a joint committee to develop a unified CAP guideline document. Full text*Projected Publication, Spring 2018

Nontuberculous Mycobacterial (NTM) Diseases

Status: Update in Progress

The minimum evaluation of a patient suspected of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung disease should include the following: (1) chest radiograph or, in the absence of cavitation, chest high-resolution computed tomography

The minimum evaluation of a patient suspected of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung disease should include the following: (1) chest radiograph or, in the absence of cavitation, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan; (2) three or more sputum specimens for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) analysis; and (3) exclusion of other disorders, such as tuberculosis (TB). Clinical, radiographic, and microbiologic criteria are equally important and all must be met to make a diagnosis of NTM lung disease. *For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact the ATS.

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