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IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

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31 results found

Nervous System Lyme Disease

Status: Update in Progress, Endorsed

Objective: To provide evidence-based recommendations on the treatment of nervous system Lyme disease and post–Lyme syndrome. Three questions were addressed: 1) Which antimicrobial agents are effective? 2) Are different regimens

Objective: To provide evidence-based recommendations on the treatment of nervous system Lyme disease and post–Lyme syndrome. Three questions were addressed: 1) Which antimicrobial agents are effective? 2) Are different regimens preferred for different manifestations of nervous system Lyme disease? 3) What duration of therapy is needed? Methods: The authors analyzed published studies (1983–2003) using a structured review process to classify the evidence related to the questions posed. Results: The panel reviewed 353 abstracts which yielded 112 potentially relevant articles that were reviewed, from which 37 articles were identified that were included in the analysis. Conclusions: There are sufficient data to conclude that, in both adults and children, this nervous system infection responds well to penicillin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, and doxycycline (Level B recommendation). Although most studies have used parenteral regimens for neuroborreliosis, several European studies support use of oral doxycycline in adults with meningitis, cranial neuritis, and radiculitis (Level B), reserving parenteral regimens for patients with parenchymal CNS involvement, other severe neurologic symptomatology, or failure to respond to oral regimens. The number of children (8 years of age) enrolled in rigorous studies of oral vs parenteral regimens has been smaller, making conclusions less statistically compelling. However, all available data indicate results are comparable to those observed in adults. In contrast, there is no compelling evidence that prolonged treatment with antibiotics has any beneficial effect in post–Lyme syndrome (Level A).   *The updated Lyme Disease Guideline will address Nervous System Lyme. Projected publication: Fall 2018

Opportunistic Infections in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

Status: Current, Endorsed

In the past decade, modifications in HCT management and supportive care have resulted in changes in recommendations for the prevention of infection in HCT patients. These changes are fueled by

In the past decade, modifications in HCT management and supportive care have resulted in changes in recommendations for the prevention of infection in HCT patients. These changes are fueled by new antimicrobial agents, increased knowledge of immune reconstitution, and expanded conditioning regimens and patient populations eligible for HCT. Despite these advances, infection is reported as the primary cause of death in 8% of autologous HCT patients and 17% to 20% of allogeneic HCT recipients [3]. The major changes in this document, including changes in recommendation ratings, are summarized here. *For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact CIBMTR.

Immunization of Infants, Children, Adolescents, and Adults

Status: Retired

Evidence-based guidelines for immunization of infants, children, adolescents, and adults have been prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). These updated guidelines replace the

Evidence-based guidelines for immunization of infants, children, adolescents, and adults have been prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). These updated guidelines replace the previous immunization guidelines published in 2002. These guidelines are prepared for health care professionals who care for either immunocompetent or immunocompromised people of all ages. *Information contained in the following guideline is outdated or superseded by another publication and should be used for historical purposes only. For the most up to date immunization schedules, see the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations.For information on efforts by the IDSA to raise awareness about the importance of adult and adolescent immunization, healthcare worker immunization and vaccine research and development, click here.

Hepatitis B

Status: Current, Endorsed

These guidelines have been written to assist physicians and other health care providers in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). These recommendations

These guidelines have been written to assist physicians and other health care providers in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). These recommendations provide a data-supported approach to patients with hepatitis B. *For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, contact the AASLD.

Management of Catheter-Related Infections

Status: Update in Progress

These updated guidelines replace the previous management guidelines published in 2001. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections

These updated guidelines replace the previous management guidelines published in 2001. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. Full text Projected Publication, Spring 2018

Influenza

Status: Update in Progress

Guidelines for the treatment of persons with influenza virus infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence‐based guidelines encompass diagnostic issues, treatment

Guidelines for the treatment of persons with influenza virus infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence‐based guidelines encompass diagnostic issues, treatment and chemoprophylaxis with antiviral medications, and issues related to institutional outbreak management for seasonal (interpandemic) influenza. They are intended for use by physicians in all medical specialties with direct patient care, because influenza virus infection is common in communities during influenza season and may be encountered by practitioners caring for a wide variety of patients. Full text*Projected publication, Spring 2018Statement by the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) on the recent publication on “Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in healthy adults and children"- April 2014

Vancomycin

Status: Update in Progress

Vancomycin is a glycopeptideantibiotic that has been in clinical use for nearly 50 years as a penicillin alternative to treat penicillinase-producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the most

Vancomycin is a glycopeptideantibiotic that has been in clinical use for nearly 50 years as a penicillin alternative to treat penicillinase-producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the most widely used antibiotics in the United States for the treatment of serious gram-positive infections involving methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA). Early use of vancomycin was associated with a number of adverse effects, including infusion-related toxicities, nephrotoxicity, and possible ototoxicity. Upon further investigation, it appears that the impurities in early formulations of vancomycin caused many of these adverse events. Its overall use was curtailed significantly with the development of semisynthetic penicillins (e.g., methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin) that were considered less toxic. However, the steady rise in the number of MRSA infections since the early 1980s has once again brought vancomycin into the forefront as the primary treatment for infections caused by this organism.Full text*For information on the timing of this update, please contact the ASHP.

Encephalitis

Status: Current

Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with encephalitis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The guidelines are intended for use by

Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with encephalitis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients with encephalitis. The guideline includes data on the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of many viral, bacterial, fungal, protozoal, and helminthic etiologies of encephalitis and provides information on when specific etiologic agents should be considered in individual patients with encephalitis. Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 07/2011.

New Fever in Critically Ill Patients

Status: Update in Progress

In some intensive care units (ICUs), the measurement of a newly elevated temperature triggers automatic orders for many tests that are time-consuming, costly, and disruptive. Moreover, the patient may experience

In some intensive care units (ICUs), the measurement of a newly elevated temperature triggers automatic orders for many tests that are time-consuming, costly, and disruptive. Moreover, the patient may experience discomfort, be exposed to unneeded radiation, or experience considerable blood loss as a result of this testing, which is often repeated several times within 24 hours and daily thereafter. In an era when use of hospital and patient resources is under intensive scrutiny, it is appropriate to assess how such fevers should be evaluated in a prudent and cost-effective manner. *For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact SCCM

Sporotrichosis

Status: Current

Guidelines for the management of patients with sporotrichosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and replace the guidelines published in 2000... They include

Guidelines for the management of patients with sporotrichosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and replace the guidelines published in 2000... They include evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with lymphocutaneous, cutaneous, pulmonary, osteoarticular, meningeal, and disseminated sporotrichosis. Recommendations are also provided for the treatment of sporotrichosis in pregnant women and in children.*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013

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