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IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

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16 results found

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

Status: Current

Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of persons with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI), both symptomatic and asymptomatic, were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society

Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of persons with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI), both symptomatic and asymptomatic, were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence-based guidelines encompass diagnostic criteria, strategies to reduce the risk of CA-UTIs, strategies that have not been found to reduce the incidence of urinary infections, and management strategies for patients with catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria or symptomatic urinary tract infection. These guidelines are intended for use by physicians in all medical specialties who perform direct patient care, with an emphasis on the care of patients in hospitals and long-term care facilities. Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 07/2013.

Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Device Infections

Status: Current, Endorsed

Despite improvements in cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) design, application of timely infection control practices, and administration of antibiotic prophylaxis at the time of device placement, CIED infections continue to

Despite improvements in cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) design, application of timely infection control practices, and administration of antibiotic prophylaxis at the time of device placement, CIED infections continue to occur and can be life-threatening. This has prompted the study of all aspects of CIED infections. Recognizing the recent advances in our understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, microbiology, management, and prevention of CIED infections, the American Heart Association commissioned this scientific statement to educate clinicians about CIED infections, provide explicit recommendations for the care of patients with suspected or established CIED infections, and highlight areas of needed research. Full text*For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, please contact the AHA.

Opportunistic Infections in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

Status: Current, Endorsed

In the past decade, modifications in HCT management and supportive care have resulted in changes in recommendations for the prevention of infection in HCT patients. These changes are fueled by

In the past decade, modifications in HCT management and supportive care have resulted in changes in recommendations for the prevention of infection in HCT patients. These changes are fueled by new antimicrobial agents, increased knowledge of immune reconstitution, and expanded conditioning regimens and patient populations eligible for HCT. Despite these advances, infection is reported as the primary cause of death in 8% of autologous HCT patients and 17% to 20% of allogeneic HCT recipients [3]. The major changes in this document, including changes in recommendation ratings, are summarized here. *For information on the timing of future updates to this guideline, contact CIBMTR.

Immunization of Infants, Children, Adolescents, and Adults

Status: Retired

Evidence-based guidelines for immunization of infants, children, adolescents, and adults have been prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). These updated guidelines replace the

Evidence-based guidelines for immunization of infants, children, adolescents, and adults have been prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). These updated guidelines replace the previous immunization guidelines published in 2002. These guidelines are prepared for health care professionals who care for either immunocompetent or immunocompromised people of all ages. *Information contained in the following guideline is outdated or superseded by another publication and should be used for historical purposes only. For the most up to date immunization schedules, see the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations.For information on efforts by the IDSA to raise awareness about the importance of adult and adolescent immunization, healthcare worker immunization and vaccine research and development, click here.

Hepatitis B

Status: Current, Endorsed

These guidelines have been written to assist physicians and other health care providers in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). These recommendations

These guidelines have been written to assist physicians and other health care providers in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). These recommendations provide a data-supported approach to patients with hepatitis B. *For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, contact the AASLD.

Encephalitis

Status: Current

Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with encephalitis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The guidelines are intended for use by

Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with encephalitis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients with encephalitis. The guideline includes data on the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of many viral, bacterial, fungal, protozoal, and helminthic etiologies of encephalitis and provides information on when specific etiologic agents should be considered in individual patients with encephalitis. Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 07/2011.

Blastomycosis

Status: Current

Blastomycosis refers to disease caused by the dimorphic fungusBlastomyces dermatitidis.This infection occurs most often in persons living in midwestern, southeastern, and south central United States and the Canadian provinces that

Blastomycosis refers to disease caused by the dimorphic fungusBlastomyces dermatitidis.This infection occurs most often in persons living in midwestern, southeastern, and south central United States and the Canadian provinces that border the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway. Recent reports have shown an increase in the incidence of blastomycosis in some of these regions. Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013.

Sporotrichosis

Status: Current

Guidelines for the management of patients with sporotrichosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and replace the guidelines published in 2000... They include

Guidelines for the management of patients with sporotrichosis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and replace the guidelines published in 2000... They include evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with lymphocutaneous, cutaneous, pulmonary, osteoarticular, meningeal, and disseminated sporotrichosis. Recommendations are also provided for the treatment of sporotrichosis in pregnant women and in children.*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 04/2013

Endocarditis Prevention

Status: Current, Endorsed

Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but life-threatening infection. Despite advances in diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy, surgical techniques, and management of complications, patients with IE still have high morbidity and mortality

Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but life-threatening infection. Despite advances in diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy, surgical techniques, and management of complications, patients with IE still have high morbidity and mortality rates related to this condition. Since the last American Heart Association (AHA) publication on prevention of IE in 1997, many authorities and societies, as well as the conclusions of published studies, have questioned the efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent IE in patients who undergo a dental, gastrointestinal (GI), or genitourinary (GU) tract procedure and have suggested that the AHA guidelines should be revised. Full text*For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, please contact the AHA.

Histoplasmosis

Status: Current

Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 06/2011.These updated

Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 06/2011.These updated guidelines replace the previous treatment guidelines published in 2000. The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. Since 2000, several new antifungal agents have become available, and clinical trials and case series have increased our understanding of the management of histoplasmosis. Advances in immunosuppressive treatment for inflammatory disorders have created new questions about the approach to prevention and treatment of histoplasmosis.  Full text

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