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IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

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Sepsis and Septic Shock

Status: Current

The importance of guidelines for identifying and treating sepsis and septic shock cannot be understated and IDSA recognizes the enormous positive impact the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Surviving

The importance of guidelines for identifying and treating sepsis and septic shock cannot be understated and IDSA recognizes the enormous positive impact the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Surviving Sepsis Campaign has had on its prevention and treatment.However, IDSA ultimately withdrew its endorsement of the 2016 guideline based on an inability to reach a timely agreement regarding specific antibiotic recommendations including stewardship, not the overall value of the guideline itself. IDSA collaborates with SCCM on several clinical practice guidelines and greatly values these opportunities. We hope that we will have an opportunity to participate in the development of the next update of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guideline and in promoting appropriate handling of this dangerous consequence of infectious diseases.IDSA collaborates with SCCM on several clinical practice guidelines and greatly values these opportunities. We hope that we will have an opportunity to participate in the development of the next update of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guideline and in promoting appropriate handling of this dangerous consequence of infectious diseases.  *For information, please contact the SCCM or the Surviving Sepsis Campaign.

Healthcare-Associated Ventriculitis and Meningitis

Status: Current

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Standards and Practice Guidelines Committee collaborated with partner organizations to convene a panel of 10 experts on healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis. The panel

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Standards and Practice Guidelines Committee collaborated with partner organizations to convene a panel of 10 experts on healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis. The panel represented pediatric and adult specialists in the field of infectious diseases and represented other organizations whose members care for patients with healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis (American Academy of Neurology, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and Neurocritical Care Society). The panel reviewed articles based on literature reviews, review articles and book chapters, evaluated the evidence and drafted recommendations. Questions were reviewed and approved by panel members. Subcategories were included for some questions based on specific populations of patients who may develop healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis after the following procedures or situations: cerebrospinal fluid shunts, cerebrospinal fluid drains, implantation of intrathecal infusion pumps, implantation of deep brain stimulation hardware, and general neurosurgery and head trauma. Recommendations were followed by the strength of the recommendation and the quality of the evidence supporting the recommendation. Many recommendations, however, were based on expert opinion because rigorous clinical data are not available. These guidelines represent a practical and useful approach to assist practicing clinicians in the management of these challenging infections. Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. The guideline was published February of 2017 and is the most current version.

HIV Chronic Pain Management

Status: Current

Pain has always been an important part of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and its experience for patients. In this guideline, we review the types of chronic pain commonly seen

Pain has always been an important part of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and its experience for patients. In this guideline, we review the types of chronic pain commonly seen among persons living with HIV (PLWH) and review the limited evidence base for treatment of chronic noncancer pain in this population. We also review the management of chronic pain in special populations of PLWH, including persons with substance use and mental health disorders. Finally, a general review of possible pharmacokinetic interactions is included to assist the HIV clinician in the treatment of chronic pain in this population. Full Text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. The guideline was published September of 2017 and is the most current version.

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