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IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

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Diarrhea

Status: Current

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was published in October 2017 and is the most current

*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was published in October 2017 and is the most current version.The widening array of recognized enteric pathogens and the increasing demand for cost-containment sharpen the need for careful clinical and public health guidelines based on the best evidence currently available. Adequate fluid and electrolyte replacement and maintenance are key to managing diarrheal illnesses. Thorough clinical and epidemiological evaluation must define the severity and type of illness (e.g., febrile, hemorrhagic, nosocomial, persistent, or inflammatory), exposures (e.g., travel, ingestion of raw or undercooked meat, seafood, or milk products, contacts who are ill, day care or institutional exposure, recent antibiotic use), and whether the patient is immunocompromised, in order to direct the performance of selective diagnostic cultures, toxin testing, parasite studies, and the administration of antimicrobial therapy (the latter as for traveler's diarrhea, shigellosis, and possibly Campylobacter jejuni enteritis). Increasing numbers of isolates resistant to antimicrobial agents and the risk of worsened illness (such as hemolytic uremic syndrome with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7) further complicate antimicrobial and antimotility drug use. Thus, prevention by avoidance of undercooked meat or seafood, avoidance of unpasteurized milk or soft cheese, and selected use of available typhoid vaccines for travelers to areas where typhoid is endemic are key to the control of infectious diarrhea.Full text

HCV Guidance

Status: Current

New direct-acting oral agents capable of curing hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have been approved for use in the United States. The initial direct-acting agents were approved in 2011, and

New direct-acting oral agents capable of curing hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have been approved for use in the United States. The initial direct-acting agents were approved in 2011, and many more oral drugs are expected to be approved in the next few years. As new information is presented at scientific conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals, health care practitioners have expressed a need for a credible source of unbiased guidance on how best to treat their patients with HCV infection. Full text

Clostridium difficile

Status: Update in Progress

This guideline is designed to improve the diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adult patients. A case of CDI is defined by the presence of symptoms (usually diarrhea) and

This guideline is designed to improve the diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adult patients. A case of CDI is defined by the presence of symptoms (usually diarrhea) and either a stool test positive for C. difficile toxins or toxigenic C. difficile, or colonoscopic or histopathologic findings revealing pseudomembranous colitis. In addition to diagnosis and management, recommended methods of infection control and environmental management of the pathogen are presented. The recommendations are based on the best available evidence and practices, as determined by a joint Expert Panel appointed by SHEA and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) (the SHEA-IDSA Expert Panel). The use of these guidelines can be impacted by the size of the institution and the resources, both financial and laboratory, available in the particular clinical setting. Full text*Projected publication, Fall 2017

Hepatitis B

Status: Current, Endorsed

These guidelines have been written to assist physicians and other health care providers in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). These recommendations

These guidelines have been written to assist physicians and other health care providers in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). These recommendations provide a data-supported approach to patients with hepatitis B. *For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, contact the AASLD.

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