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IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

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6 results found

HRS: Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Device Lead Management and Extraction

Status: Current, Endorsed

The 2017 HRS Expert Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Device Lead Management and Extraction, developed in collaboration with the ACC, AHA, APHRS, ASA, EHRA, IDSA, LAHRS, PACES, and STS,

The 2017 HRS Expert Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Device Lead Management and Extraction, developed in collaboration with the ACC, AHA, APHRS, ASA, EHRA, IDSA, LAHRS, PACES, and STS, is intended to help clinicians in their decision-making process for managing leads and builds on the 2009 Transvenous Lead Extraction: Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus on Facilities, Training, Indications, and Patient Management document. It provides practical clinical guidance in the broad field of lead management, including lead extraction.The statement focuses on identifying the presence of lead malfunction, deciding on whether to abandon or to extract a lead that is no longer clinically necessary or at higher risk for failure, offering guidance on whether a cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) is involved in an infectious process, providing recommendations on when lead extraction should be considered, and discussing specific clinical considerations for patient management when a lead extraction is performed.The document includes specific recommendations in the following areas: Lead SurvivalExisting CIED Lead ManagementIndications for Lead Extraction (Infectious)Indications for Lead Extraction (Noninfectious)Outcomes and Follow-up  Full Text

Endocarditis Management

Status: Current, Endorsed

Infective endocarditis is a potentially lethal disease that has undergone major changes in both host and pathogen. The epidemiology of infective endocarditis has become more complex with today’s myriad healthcare

Infective endocarditis is a potentially lethal disease that has undergone major changes in both host and pathogen. The epidemiology of infective endocarditis has become more complex with today’s myriad healthcare associated factors that predispose to infection. Moreover, changes in pathogen prevalence,in particular a more common staphylococcal origin, have affected outcomes, which have not improved despite medical and surgical advances.Full text  *AHA published a correction to the 2015 original guideline. See August 22, 2016 correction.*For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, please contact the AHA.

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

Status: Current

Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of persons with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI), both symptomatic and asymptomatic, were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society

Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of persons with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI), both symptomatic and asymptomatic, were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence-based guidelines encompass diagnostic criteria, strategies to reduce the risk of CA-UTIs, strategies that have not been found to reduce the incidence of urinary infections, and management strategies for patients with catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria or symptomatic urinary tract infection. These guidelines are intended for use by physicians in all medical specialties who perform direct patient care, with an emphasis on the care of patients in hospitals and long-term care facilities. Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 07/2013.

Endocarditis Prevention

Status: Current, Endorsed

Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but life-threatening infection. Despite advances in diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy, surgical techniques, and management of complications, patients with IE still have high morbidity and mortality

Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but life-threatening infection. Despite advances in diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy, surgical techniques, and management of complications, patients with IE still have high morbidity and mortality rates related to this condition. Since the last American Heart Association (AHA) publication on prevention of IE in 1997, many authorities and societies, as well as the conclusions of published studies, have questioned the efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent IE in patients who undergo a dental, gastrointestinal (GI), or genitourinary (GU) tract procedure and have suggested that the AHA guidelines should be revised. Full text*For information on the timing of future updates of this guideline, please contact the AHA.

Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

Status: Update in Progress

The purpose of this guideline is to provide recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in adult populations 18 years of age. The recommendations were developed on the basis

The purpose of this guideline is to provide recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in adult populations 18 years of age. The recommendations were developed on the basis of a review of published evidence, with the strength of the recommendation and quality of the evidence graded using previously described Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) criteria (table 1) [1]. Recommendations are relevant only for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria and do not address prophylaxis for prevention of symptomatic or asymptomatic urinary infection. This guideline is not meant to replace clinical judgment.Screening of asymptomatic subjects for bacteriuria is appropriate if bacteriuria has adverse outcomes that can be prevented by antimicrobial therapy [2]. Outcomes of interest are short term, such as symptomatic urinary infection (including bacteremia with sepsis or worsening functional status), and longer term, such as progression to chronic kidney disease or hypertension, development of urinary tract cancer, or decreased duration of survival. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria may itself be associated with undesirable outcomes, including subsequent antimicrobial resistance, adverse drug effects, and cost. If treatment of bacteriuria is not beneficial, screening of asymptomatic populations to identify bacteriuria is not indicated, unless performed in a research study to further explore the biology or clinical significance of bacteriuria. Thus, there are 2 topics of interest: whether asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with adverse outcomes, and whether the interventions of screening and antimicrobial treatment improve these outcomes.Full textA correction has been published: Clin Infect Dis (2005) 40 (10): 1556. *Projected publication, Fall 2018

Uncomplicated Cystitis and Pyelonephritis (UTI)

Status: Current

A Panel of International Experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in collaboration with the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) to update the

A Panel of International Experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in collaboration with the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) to update the 1999 Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection Guidelines by the IDSA. Co-sponsoring organizations include the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Urological Association, Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases–Canada, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The focus of this work is treatment of women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis, diagnoses limited in these guidelines to premenopausal, non-pregnant women with no known urological abnormalities or co-morbidities. The issues of in vitro resistance prevalence and the ecological adverse effects of antimicrobial therapy (collateral damage) were considered as important factors in making optimal treatment choices and thus are reflected in the rankings of recommendations.  Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. This guideline was last reviewed and deemed current as of 07/2013.

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