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    04/18/2017

    JAMA Neurology: Enhanced Epilepsy Surveillance and Awareness in the Age of Zika

    JAMA Neurology: Enhanced Epilepsy Surveillance and Awareness in the Age of Zika

    04/17/2017

    CDC: Interim Guidance for Managing Occupational Exposures to Zika Virus for Healthcare Personnel

    Zika virus is primarily spread by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. Sexual and maternal-fetal transmission have also been well described. Transmission via transfusion of blood products has been reported in Brazil, but to date, transmission of Zika virus via blood transfusion has not been reported in the United States.
    03/13/2017

    CDC Updates Zika Guidance for South Florida

    The CDC will shift the time-frame, and its area of potential increased risk, for blood and tissue sample guidance for Zika transmission for residents of South Florida, according to the agency.

     
    10/20/2016

    CDC Updates Guidance for Pregnant Women and Women and Men of Reproductive Age for Zika Virus Infection

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) previously issued travel, testing, and other guidance related to areas of active Zika virus transmission in Florida.

    Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy — U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016–April 25, 2017

    Pregnant women living in or traveling to areas with local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission are at risk for Zika virus infection, which can lead to severe fetal and infant brain abnormalities and microcephaly.

    Florida investigation links four recent Zika cases to local mosquito-borne virus transmission

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been informed by the State of Florida that Zika virus infections in four people were likely caused by bites of local Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The cases are likely the first known occurrence of local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission in the continental United States. CDC is closely coordinating with Florida officials who are leading the ongoing investigations, and at the state’s request, sent a CDC medical epidemiologist to provide additional assistance.

    CDC assisting Utah investigation of Zika virus infection apparently not linked to travel

    CDC is assisting in the investigation of a case of Zika in a Utah resident who is a family contact of the elderly Utah resident who died in late June. The deceased patient had traveled to an area with Zika and lab tests showed he had uniquely high amounts of virus—more than 100,000 times higher than seen in other samples of infected people—in his blood. Laboratories in Utah and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported evidence of Zika infection in both Utah residents.

    Public Health Officials Investigating Unique Case of Zika

    (Salt Lake City, UT) -- Utah health officials confirmed today a new case of Zika in Utah and have launched an investigation to determine how the person became infected.  The new case is a family contact who helped care for the individual who died in late June from unknown causes and who has been infected with Zika after traveling to an area with Zika.

    CDC releases interim guidance on Zika testing and interpretation of results

    May 31, 2016 - Today, CDC published interim guidance for Zika virus antibody testing and interpretation of results.

    Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women — United States and Territories, May 2016

    May 20, 2016 - In February 2016, CDC, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, launched comprehensive surveillance systems to report and actively monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among symptomatic and asymptomatic women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection.

    Interim Guidance for Zika Virus Testing on Urine

    May 10, 2016 - CDC updated its interim diagnostic testing guidance for Zika virus in public health laboratories based on preliminary data demonstrating that Zika virus can be found at higher levels or for longer duration in urine than in serum (blood)

    CDC concludes Zika causes microcephaly and other birth defects

    April 14, 2016 - Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have concluded, after careful review of existing evidence, that Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and other severe fetal brain defects.

    National Zika Summit Focused on Coordinated U.S. Response

    April 1, 2016 - Today, more than 300 local, state, and federal government officials; health experts; and non-government partners are gathering at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to prepare for the likelihood of mosquito-borne transmission of the Zika virus in some parts of the continental United States. 

    Preventing Transmission of Zika Virus in Labor and Delivery Settings Through Implementation of Standard Precautions

    March 22, 2016 - Zika virus transmission was detected in the Region of the Americas (Americas) in Brazil in May 2015, and as of March 21, 2016, local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus had been reported in 32 countries and territories in the Americas, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    COCA Call: Update on Interim Zika Virus Clinical Guidance and Recommendations

    February 25, 2016 - During this COCA Call, participants will learn why CDC has updated the clinical guidelines and how they can use the guidelines for Zika virus disease evaluation and testing.

    CDC Zika Updates: New Lab Test, MMWR Summaries, Travel Advice for Summer Olympics

    February 26, 2016 - In response to a request from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on February 26 issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for a diagnostic tool for Zika virus that will be distributed to qualified laboratories and, in the United States, those that are certified to perform high-complexity tests.

    Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection — United States

    February 19, 2016 - CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease.

    Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure

    March 25, 2016 - CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease.

    Local Transmission of Zika Virus

    February 12, 2016 - On December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first locally acquired case of Zika virus disease in the United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. Passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease identified 27 laboratory-confirmed cases in patients with illness onset during November 25, 2015-January 28, 2016.

    Interim Guidelines for Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus

    February 5, 2016 - Zika virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus primarily transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes (1,2). Infection with Zika virus is asymptomatic in an estimated 80% of cases (2,3), and when Zika virus does cause illness, symptoms are generally mild and self-limited. Recent evidence suggests a possible association between maternal Zika virus infection and adverse fetal outcomes, such as congenital microcephaly (4,5), as well as a possible association with Guillain-Barré syndrome. 

    Interim Guidance for the Evaluation and Management of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection

    Update: Interim Guidance for the Evaluation and Management of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection — United States, August 2016 August 19, 2016 CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (1). Laboratory testing is recommended for 1) infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy and 2) infants who have abnormal clinical or neuroimaging findings suggestive of congenital Zika syndrome and a maternal epidemiologic link suggesting possible transmission, regardless of maternal Zika virus test results. Congenital Zika syndrome is a recently recognized pattern of congenital anomalies associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy that includes microcephaly, intracranial calcifications or other brain anomalies, or eye anomalies, among others (2). Recommended infant laboratory evaluation includes both molecular (real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction [rRT-PCR]) and serologic (immunoglobulin M [IgM]) testing. Initial samples should be collected directly from the infant in the first 2 days of life, if possible; testing of cord blood is not recommended. A positive infant serum or urine rRT-PCR test result confirms congenital Zika virus infection. Positive Zika virus IgM testing, with a negative rRT-PCR result, indicates probable congenital Zika virus infection. In addition to infant Zika virus testing, initial evaluation of all infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy should include a comprehensive physical examination, including a neurologic examination, postnatal head ultrasound, and standard newborn hearing screen. Infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection should have a comprehensive ophthalmologic exam and hearing assessment by auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing before 1 month of age. Recommendations for follow-up of infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection depend on whether abnormalities consistent with congenital Zika syndrome are present. Infants with abnormalities consistent with congenital Zika syndrome should have a coordinated evaluation by multiple specialists within the first month of life; additional evaluations will be needed within the first year of life, including assessments of vision, hearing, feeding, growth, and neurodevelopmental and endocrine function. Families and caregivers will also need ongoing psychosocial support and assistance with coordination of care. Infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection without apparent abnormalities should have ongoing developmental monitoring and screening by the primary care provider; repeat hearing testing is recommended. This guidance will be updated when additional information becomes available.   Read the full MMWR>>

    CDC Guidance for Pregnant Women for Local Zika Virus Transmission-Brownsville, TX

    CDC Guidance for Travel and Testing of Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age for Zika Virus Infection Related to the Investigation for Local Mosquito-borne Zika Virus Transmission in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas    Summary On November 28, 2016

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