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IDSA Practice Guidelines

Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

Attributes of good guidelines include validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clinical flexibility, clarity, multidisciplinary process, review of evidence, and documentation. [Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines, 1990]

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Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Adult Patients With Cancer-Related Immunosuppression

Status: Current

Updated guidelines by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Infectious Diseases Society of America on antimicrobial prophylaxis for adult patients with immunosuppression associated with cancer and its treatment. Link

Updated guidelines by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Infectious Diseases Society of America on antimicrobial prophylaxis for adult patients with immunosuppression associated with cancer and its treatment. Link to full text

Cysticercosis

Status: Current

Guidelines for the clinical management of patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC) were prepared by a panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society of Tropical Medicine

Guidelines for the clinical management of patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC) were prepared by a panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). The guidelines are intended for infectious disease specialists, neurologists, neurological surgeons, internists, pediatricians, and family practitioners.These guidelines present our approaches to the diagnosis and management of patients with the different forms of neurocysticercosis, including viable parenchymal neurocysticercosis, single enhancing lesions, calcified parenchymal neurocysticercosis, ventricular neurocysticercosis, and subarachnoid neurocysticercosis. Our recommendations are based on the best evidence available. Due to the complex variations in clinical manifestations and the limitations of the literature, many of the recommendations are based on observational studies, anecdotal data, or expert opinion rather than randomized clinical trials. The approaches we describe are intended to be both applicable and feasible in the United States and Canada (for simplicity, referred to here as North America). The recommendations may not apply for settings where resource constraints may limit their applicability.Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. The guideline was published February of 2018 and is the most current version.

Fever and Neutropenia in Adults with Cancer

Status: Current

This updated joint ASCO/Infectious Diseases Society of American (IDSA) guideline provides direction on outpatient management of fever and neutropenia in patients with cancer.Full text

This updated joint ASCO/Infectious Diseases Society of American (IDSA) guideline provides direction on outpatient management of fever and neutropenia in patients with cancer.Full text

Clostridium difficile

Status: Current

A panel of experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) to update the 2010 clinical practice guideline on

A panel of experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) to update the 2010 clinical practice guideline on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adults. The update, which has incorporated recommendations for children (following the adult recommendations for epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment), includes significant changes in the management of this infection and reflects the evolving controversy over best methods for diagnosis. Clostridium difficile remains the most important cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea and has become the most commonly identified cause of healthcare-associated infection in adults in the United States. Moreover, C. difficile has established itself as an important community pathogen. Although the prevalence of the epidemic and virulent ribotype 027 strain has declined markedly along with overall CDI rates in parts of Europe, it remains one of the most commonly identified strains in the United States where it causes a sizable minority of CDIs, especially healthcare-associated CDIs. This guideline updates recommendations regarding epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, infection prevention, and environmental management.Full text*Every 12 to 18 months following publication, IDSA reviews its guidelines to determine whether an update is required. The guideline was published February of 2018 and is the most current version.

Laboratory Diagnosis of Infectious Disease

Status: Current

The critical nature of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician/advanced practice provider and the microbiologists who provide enormous value

The critical nature of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician/advanced practice provider and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the healthcare team. This document, developed by experts in laboratory and adult and pediatric clinical medicine, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions. This document presents a system-based approach rather than specimen-based approach, and includes bloodstream and cardiovascular system infections, central nervous system infections, ocular infections, soft tissue infections of the head and neck, upper and lower respiratory infections, infections of the gastrointestinal tract, intra-abdominal infections, bone and joint infections, urinary tract infections, genital infections, and other skin and soft tissue infections; or into etiologic agent groups, including arthropod-borne infections, viral syndromes, and blood and tissue parasite infections. Each section contains introductory concepts, a summary of key points, and detailed tables that list suspected agents; the most reliable tests to order; the samples (and volumes) to collect in order of preference; specimen transport devices, procedures, times, and temperatures; and detailed notes on specific issues regarding the test methods, such as when tests are likely to require a specialized laboratory or have prolonged turnaround times. In addition, the pediatric needs of specimen management are also emphasized. There is intentional redundancy among the tables and sections, as many agents and assay choices overlap. The document is intended to serve as a guidance for physicians in choosing tests that will aid them to quickly and accurately diagnose infectious diseases in their patients. Full text

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