Our Priorities

A Strong, Dynamic Infectious Diseases Workforce

ID professionals are needed now more than ever to tackle the many medical mysteries of our rapidly changing world.

Addressing Antimicrobial Resistance

Many common drugs are losing their effectiveness, a circumstance commonly known as antimicrobial resistance.
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National Leadership on ID Clinical Guidelines

We inform medical professionals’ and patients’ decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances.

A Strong, Dynamic ID Workforce

ID professionals are needed now more than ever to tackle the many medical mysteries of our rapidly changing world. That is why a robust pipeline and pathway for ID professionals is so important. Ensuring we have enough ID experts to meet the challenges of the future is only possible if ID experts are compensated in accordance with their value to hospitals and health systems; payers; other medical professionals; and patients. In recognition of ID experts’ critical contributions to public health, Congress is currently considering legislation, like the Biopreparedness Workforce Act and the PREVENT Act, to support necessary investments in the profession. 

Fast facts about the ID workforce:

  • 21% of available ID trainee positions in the United States went unfilled in 2020.
  • ID physicians are in short supply in some parts of the United States - particularly rural areas.
  • Lower salaries for ID physicians, combined with medical school debt, has hindered recruitment.
  • Attracting the next generation of physicians to work in ID is sorely needed because physicians over the age of 55 make up a substantial portion of the current ID workforce.

More on ID Workforce

Addressing Antimicrobial Resistance

Antibiotics, antivirals, and other antimicrobials have saved millions of lives worldwide, but these drugs are losing their effectiveness, a circumstance commonly known as antimicrobial resistance. The growing problem of resistance has undermined the usefulness of some antimicrobials, resulting in more than 23,000 deaths each year and placing public health and national security at serious risk. Furthermore, treating antibiotic-resistant infections costs the U.S. health care system an estimated $21-34 billion annually. ID experts are working to counter these "bad bugs" and save lives.

 

National leadership on ID clinical guidelines

Clinical guidelines are statements developed to inform medical professionals’ and patients’ decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. Guidelines are maintained by both governmental groups (for example, the National Institutes of Health) and nongovernmental organizations (for example, the Infectious Diseases Society of America) to ensure best practices in diagnosis and treatment. Most recently, the Infectious Diseases Society of America published guidance on diagnosis, treatment and infection prevention practices related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Clinical guidelines are a critical component to helping practitioners respond effectively and quickly to outbreaks, epidemics and pandemics. 

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